How to get to Kingairloch from Glasgow

It takes approximately three hours to drive from Glasgow to Kingairloch. The roads that you have to drive along are some of the most awe-inspiring roads in the UK. So sit back, buckle in and get some good driving tunes on ( you’ll find the radio signal often drops out!…….).

Map of route from Glasgow to Kingairloch

Map taken from Google maps

Visitors must note that there is no public transport to Kingairloch, so you must have your own car. If you are flying into Glasgow, check out Europcar’s hire charges- we find them to offer very competitive rates, especially if you book in advance.

You need to head north on M8, heading for the Erskine Bridge. Once across the bridge, take the A82 and make your way to the beautiful Loch Lomond. You must take care on the road around Loch Lomond, there are numerous potholes and quite a few places where it is very tight for lorries to pass. This consequently means traffic is often slow, but don’t worry, you’ve got the beautiful loch and mountains to gaze at.

Loch Lomond and Ben Lomond

The Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond

The road network is very simple to follow, you only have to stick with the A82! After Loch Lomond you will head through Crianlarich and Tyndrum. In Tyndrum there is an award winning Fish and Chips called The Real Food Cafe plus the Green Welly Stop where you can stock up on essentials (their whisky and gin selection is first class!).

Green Welly Whisky Selection

There is an incredible choice of whisky at The Green Welly Stop

After Tyndrum the roads open up as you drive through the iconic Glencoe. You cannot fail to be awestruck by the mountains on either side of the glen, it is so dramatic that scenes from Skyfall and Harry Potter and numerous adverts have been filmed throughout the glen. Through the winter, if you are driving through at dusk, dawn or night you have to be mindful of deer that may be by the roadside.

Deer in Glencoe

Take care driving through Glencoe in the Winer, deer are often close to the road.

The Ballachulish Bridge is the next most notable landmark, this bridge spans the narrows between Loch Leven and Loch Linnhe. It’s worth having a quick glance at your fuel gauge at this moment as shortly after the bridge there is a fuel station. When you cross the ferry, you can buy fuel in Strontian, but I would advice to make sure your tank is topped up here!

After the village of Onich it is another four or five minutes for the turning to The Corran Ferry. You do not have to use the ferry, but it saves another hour’s drive. The ferry runs very regularly starting at 6:30 Monday-Saturday and 8:45 on Sundays until 21:30. There is no need to book, just get into the queue and wait until you are waved on. Each crossing is about five minutes and costs £8.20; you can pay by card but that doe incur a small surcharge. You are welcome to get out of your car on the ferry and take in your surroundings. Sometimes in the summer, dolphins are seen in the narrows.

Corran Ferry

When you cross the ferry, you’re nearly at Kingairloch!

After the ferry, turn left onto the A861 and follow the coastal road until you come across the turning for Kingairloch on the left (approx. six miles). It is signed and we usually have a Kingairloch poster at the end of the road. The B8043 is a singletrack road, so take your time! If you meet a car or one comes up behind you, use the passing places. Do not drive on the verges, as they are soft! You may encounter a traffic jam of cows or sheep, just wind down the window and tap your arm on the side of the car and they should move along.

Cow Traffic Jam

The only traffic jam you will come across.

After the little hamlet of Kilamlieu the road does get quite dramatic, with a sheer rock face above you and then below you to the shore of Loch Linnhe. I’ve always called it the Indiana Jones road, you can see from the below photo why! Along these cliffs, look out for the feral goats.

The coastal road to Kingairloch

You will then enter Kingairloch. The Steadings is the first house you come to. Going around the glen, you will then come across a finger post sign showing the way to The Old School and Elastic Cottage. If none of these houses are to be yours, carry on up the hill and at the top there is another finger post sign pointing you down to the left. Pier Cottage is the next cottage, followed by The Old Post Office and The Gate Lodge. The Kingairloch House B&B is just s bit further beyond The Gate Lodge. As for Riverside Cottage, carry on past the entrance to Kingairloch House with the large grey wall on your left, go through the metal gate and the cottage is to your right. Guests coming to our remote Seaview Cottage must phone when they are crossing the ferry so we can make arrangements to show them the route to the cottage or to arrange taking their luggage and shopping to the cottage.

 

I hope that you have found this article useful when planning how to get to Kingairloch from Glasgow. These roads really are some of the most iconic in Scotland. If you want to stop for photographs, make sure to use designated laybys or passing places on the single-track road.